36 TYPES OF WILD EDIBLE MUSHROOMS

This article is a visual guide to finding edible mushrooms in the wild.

Mushrooms are another option for finding food in the wild, and can be supplemented with things such as:

That’s right… the wilderness is a veritable buffet.

It is easy to mix up different kinds of mushrooms, though, so never eat a mushroom unless you are 100% sure of its identification.

Let’s take a look at some fun fungi and some tasty toadstools.

A GUIDE TO EDIBLE MUSHROOMS

Apricot Jelly

Apricot Jelly

Bear's Head Tooth

Bear’s Head Tooth

Beefsteak Fungus

Beefsteak Fungus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Morel

Black Morel

Blue Chanterelle

Blue Chanterelle

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chicken of the Woods

Chicken of the Woods

Comb Tooth

Comb Tooth

Common Puffball

Common Puffball

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fairy Ring

Scotch Bonnet

Giant Puff Ball

Giant Puff Ball

Golden Chanterelle

Golden Chanterelle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedgehog

Hedgehog

Hen of the Woods

Hen of the Woods

Hexagonal Pored Polypore

Hexagonal Pored Polypore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horn of Plenty

Horn of Plenty

Horse

Horse

Indigo Milkcap

Indigo Milkcap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ink Caps

Ink Caps

Jelly Ear

Jelly Ear

King Bolete

King Bolete

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Larch Bolete

Larch Bolete

Lion's Mane

Lion’s Mane

Lobster

Lobster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meadow (Field)

Meadow (Field)

Mica Cap

Mica Cap

Oyster

Oyster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Cracked Bolete

Red Cracked Bolete

Rosy Gomphidius

Rosy Gomphidius

Saffron Milk Cap

Saffron Milk Cap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scaly Hedgehog

Scaly Hedgehog

Shaggy Mane

Shaggy Mane

Slimy Spike Cap

Slimy Spike Cap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Western Giant Puffball

Western Giant Puffball

Yellow-Gilled Russula

Yellow-Gilled Russula

Yellow Swamp Russula

Yellow Swamp Russula

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PREPARING MUSHROOMS TO EAT

To prepare mushrooms for eating, make sure to wash them with water and scrub the exterior thoroughly. If cooking is possible, slice the mushrooms and then roast or saute them. Adding butter or oil while cooking will improve the taste.

 

Stay tuned Wednesday for our second part, A Visual Guide to Poisonous Mushrooms.

Good luck and stay prepared!

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Comments

  1. I know quite a bit about eating wild plants, but I am scared of mushrooms. Be very careful

    • Ron K. says:

      Be very, very careful…I thought I knew what a fall “Button Mushroom” was, but picked some last year that looked very much like them, but got very sick after eating them..If you are not 100% sure, leave them in the woods..:)

      • Melissa says:

        The rule of thumb ALWAYS is “when in doubt, throw it out!” Unless you are 100% sure of the safety of what you’ve collected, dump them or take them to someone who can give you a positive ID.

        • I couldn’t agree more with you, Melissa. Even if the above article and pictures are from an expert, I wouldn’t rely on one guide to know if I’ve ID’d a mushroom correctly. Research, research, research. Have fun with it! But yes, “when in doubt, throw it out!” Mushrooms are amazing food and medicine.

      • JC Sorell says:

        Any time anyone has eaten a poisonous mushroom by mistake the very first thing that should be done is to take Milk Thistle. Poison mushroom will destroy a liver in a matter of hours. I worked in ICU years ago. The docs will wait until the patient is just about dead and permanently damaged before trying any home remedy that will work. I always have some on hand. There are times we simply need to clean out all medication toxicity effects (tylenol is one notorious drug for clogging up the liver)done to our bodies. One old friend I bumped into had cirrhosis. She was going to a pain clinic for many years. She was sent to a liver doc who had her on so much gut wrenching medication and they all told her it was NOT reversible. I got her on milk thistle and told her to have her pain clinic to get her off of tylenol based pain killers for a few month, to switch to something else. The liver doc was in shock and wanted to know what she did. Her lab values were normal after three years. The liver is one organ which will actually regenerate itself if it has a clean environment to work at in the process.

  2. Yes I agree, hence the disclaimer.

    I was hesitant to put this article up, but I want this site to be a full survival encyclopedia, so it needed to be covered at some point.

    ALWAYS EXERCISE CAUTION!!!

  3. One of my faves is Honey mushrooms. They’re only found around November, and are usually found growing on dead, decaying wood, in large clumps, of 1″-2″ caps on slender stems. They’re about the color of honey, to a little darker, with flattened caps. They closely resemble a poisonous mushroom (can’t remember the name) but are easily tested. Before cooking and eating, you need to take one of the caps, and press between two pieces of paper, weighted down, or between pages of a book. Leave it overnight. The next day, you should see a spore print on the paper, from the gills on the underside of the cap. If it’s white, it’s a honey mushroom, and safe to eat. If it’s purple, DO NOT EAT!!!

  4. Elizabeth says:

    The procedure Janet is describing is called “Taking a spore print”. A good mushroom field guide will tell you what color spores to expect from your edibles.

    They can be quite beautiful too, and you can use them to culture more mushrooms if you so desire. Be warned, this is addicting.

  5. I have to say, this is a poor post.

    You have an inaccuracy–the “blue Chanterelle” you have is actually another black trumpet/horn of plenty.

    Many of the descriptions you have provided are misleading:

    “Fairy ring mushroom” — there are many different kinds of mushrooms that grow in fairy rings, some are DEADLY. Your photo provides no data nor close enough examination to determine which kind you have.

    Also “slimy cap” is not a scientific, nor even a common name. Many DEADLY mushrooms have slimy caps.

    I know you have a disclaimer, but this post is so poor that it should be revised. The information is misleading, and, while the disclaimer might protect you legally, morally you have a responsibility to provide better info.

    • Adjustments have been made.

    • JC Sorell says:

      If a person know what a false morel looks like they can know all the other morels are edible. They have a sort of spongy look to them Also the puff balls are very edible Some wild mushroom need to be boiled first and rinsed and then they can be sliced and fried. Some of the best morels come in fairy rings. Some rings can yield up to sixty pounds of edible delight. I’d love to find a local class that teaches wild edible mushrooms so I can expand my territory, The best mushroom hunting days come in the spring when it is just the right temperature,foggy, and on the mildly cool side. Some can even be dehydrated and used throughout the year.

  6. Clint Eric Hampson says:

    You left out a couple non poisonous varieties that grow naturally here in North America. They are of the Pscilocybe family. The most common is the pscilocybe cubensis which grows in the southern plains which has a copper to gold cap and is commonly found growing on the manure of grain fed cattle and horses. The other is pscilocybe cyanescen which is native to the northeastern states and has a dark caramel undulating cap and is known to grow on alder chips or conifer mulch. Not only are they edible but they offer some of the most intraspective and enjoyable experiences you will likely ever have. Happy hunting!

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