Connect with us

Bugging In - Hunkering Down

Bugging-In: Prepping to Survive in Your Home

Published

on

Hunkering Down at Home

Bugging in at home is an expression that refers to preparing your home for survival for an extensive period of time. It requires a defensive position that you may have to take in an emergency.

The word “hunker down” AKA “Bugging-In is originated from the Old Norse term huka, which means to squat, and the German word hocken, which means to crouch down. The word was first reported in the United Kingdom in the eighteenth century. It had been popularized as a word used by President Lyndon Johnson in the 1960s to inform people to stay wherever they are at given times.

Threats that May Mandate Bugging-In at Home?

Natural Disasters:

In some instances, a tornado, hurricane, earthquake, or avalanche can force you to stay in one spot because there is no way to get out safely. Let’s say that your neighborhood experienced a category 4 or 5 hurricanes or a 7.0 or higher earthquake.

The odds are that the environment around you will be dangerous, and there would be little that the Emergency Services in your area could do to help you out. You’d have to Bugging-In at home for a while.

Times of war or civil unrest:

Some people must Bugging-In as a result of war or civil unrest. People in many parts of the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and Africa have been forced to Bugging-In due to wars.

The Israel-Palestine dispute and the continuing civil war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are examples. Riots in Detroit in 1967 and Newark, NJ in 1968 are also examples of society being out of control for some period of time.  In these kinds of cases, Bugging-In down may be needed.

Man-Made Disasters:

There have been too many bomb attacks in America to be surprised anymore.  The unfortunate examples of Oklahoma City, Boston, and of course, NY all spring to mind.  If a situation like these strikes your community, you would have to stay put, just as the people in these locales did.

It’s a Matter of Safety

Bugging in, preparing your home for survival is often the only thing that can be done if you are in a severe disaster. It may be the key difference between life and death. You will have to ensure that you prepare yourself and Bugging-In after a catastrophe hits, no matter where you live or how that tragedy occurred in the first place.

Related:

Why Would You Need to Bugging-In at Home?

Bugging In: Fortifying and Securing Your Home for SHTF Moment

Bugging In: Preparing for A Grid-Down Energy Needs

Emergency Food and Water Storage: Basic Survival Principles

Personal Hygiene in a Basic Emergency Sanitation: Maintaining Cleanliness

Devices to Help You Communicate Effectively in an Emergency Situation

DYI: First Aid Emergency Kit Contents List

Sources:

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/hunker–down

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Survival_Prepping/EFg7DwAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=hunker+down&pg=PT9&printsec=frontcover

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Be_a_Prepper/NkttjwEACAAJ?hl=en

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0omCB9VDB5DZjgftyIC9Rw

Bugging In - Hunkering Down

Bugging In: Preparing for A Grid-Down Energy Needs

Published

on

Alternative Energy Sources

Many events can take out the power sources in a local place. If this occurs, then you need to be sure that you have equipment that you can use to take action when that happens. You can still get power to your property if you use a few sensible considerations of long-term power outage survival

Use a Generator in Power Outage

A generator can be a lifesaver. It is a device that will deliver power to your home, even if the electrical grid to your home is off.  There are many great generators that you can use, but you have to be aware of a few pointers when buying one and how to prepare for power outage.

What specifics should you look for in a generator?

  • The number of watts it can handle, a unit with more watts can power up more appliances.
  • The fuel it uses; gasoline is typically used in many generators.
  • How much fuel it will use in a given time; that is, how long will it take for the generator to use up all the fuel you put into it?
  • Whether or not batteries Power outlets can power it;
  • how many does it have?

Where will the generator fit in the home?

Look for a generator that can be put in a place where nothing outside your house can hurt it. If you can find a generator that can connect to a fuse box in your house, then it will be perfect. Otherwise, a transportable generator that can power up a few items at a time may be the route to go.

How much maintenance will the generator require?

The fan in a generator might have to be checked on occasion. The oil may also have to be replaced in some models.

Alternative Energy Sources For Grid-Down Energy Needs

While a generator could work for getting energy into your home, another idea is to look for alternative energy sources before you need them. If you can power your home without using fuel or any electricity off of a grid, with solar or wind, for instance, then you will be at an advantage and ahead of the game when disaster strikes.

Below is information about solar and wind options.

Solar

A solar-powered home would be perfect, as you will be taking in energy from the sun’s rays. Panels will collect the rays, usually on the roof, that will convert the energy into use for powering your home.

Solar power can be gathered in your home with these steps:

  • Take a look at the total amount of energy that your house uses in a normal month. Think about getting sufficient panels and a solar generator that can manage that amount.
  • Have some solar panels installed onto the roof of your home. Make certain they are installed and positioned by professions to have the maximum exposure to catch the sun’s rays.
  • Get that generator joined to a fuse box or other material that will be responsible for distributing the power to your house.

This should give you lots of energy to ensure that you don’t have to use common resources. In fact, this will be of use even in safe periods and may cut down on the cost of electricity in your home.

Wind

Wind power is something that is typically gathered in large fields where huge windmills may be found. Wind turbines will be joined to these windmills and create energy from the kinetic force that comes with the windmills moving. This will then move the energy into a generator for powering up different places.

There is a potential for you to use wind power in your house to make it capable of controlling power the right way. Check with experts on the legality of using it on your home and the correct position.

Wind power can really be essential if you use a few considerations:

Figure out how much power you need off a wind turbine and order a windmill appropriate for it.

Get the proper windmill installed. A common windmill may be about 80 feet high and cost $30,000, but you may be able to locate a smaller model that is not as costly depending on where you go.

Have your wind turbine connected to a generator or other material used to bring power out to your home.

Look at the standards for living in your area and see if you can get this to work on your property. Not all communities will allow you to get such a material ready on your home. You might have to ask your local housing board to see if you can add it.

If you have a significantly spaced property apart from others, then a wind turbine may work. Otherwise, you might want to stick with solar power instead due to the legal consequences that may be associated.

Be certain you fully grasp whether wind power or solar power is the right form of alternative power for you.

Related:

Bugging-In: Prepping to Survive in Your Home

Why Would You Need to Bugging-In at Home?

Bugging In: Fortifying and Securing Your Home for SHTF Moment

Emergency Food and Water Storage: Basic Survival Principles

Personal Hygiene in a Basic Emergency Sanitation: Maintaining Cleanliness

Devices to Help You Communicate Effectively in an Emergency Situation

DYI: First Aid Emergency Kit Contents List

Sources:

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/hunker–down

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Survival_Prepping/EFg7DwAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=hunker+down&pg=PT9&printsec=frontcover

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Be_a_Prepper/NkttjwEACAAJ?hl=en

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0omCB9VDB5DZjgftyIC9Rw

Continue Reading

Bugging In - Hunkering Down

Bugging In: Fortifying and Securing Your Home for SHTF Moment

Published

on

Securing Your Home After Disaster

A disaster can bring out the best in society as people come together to help one another. However, a disaster can also bring out the worst in people. The desperate need to survive in such a condition and the panic that could arise can cause people to become violent. 

How to Secure Your Home

We know that some will engage in criminal acts.  With that in mind, it will be best to protect yourself by using several security measures to keep your property safe you to prepper home security.

Create Layers of Protection

Alarms can be used in your home to alert you to an intruder on your property or even in your home.  Alarms from a reputable security system should be placed around to defending your home in shtf moment

Alarms Should Entail The Following:

  • A series of durable, tamper-resistant sensors that go around doors, windows, and other spaces outside your home
  • Possible invisible fence sensors around the perimeter of your property
  • Glass breakage sensors that can go off in the event of a broken window
  • A battery-powered control panel that requires the entering of a password
  • Enough sensors to adequately cover your property.

Security Cameras

Cameras can be added to many places all around the outside of the property.  They can be connected to a security system and may be battery-powered. Cameras can be placed around the corners, in entry spots, and at several other places outside your residence.

Here are a few tips for using cameras:

  • Get cameras that you know will be sturdy and durable. Don’t buy cheap models that might wear out fast.
  • Please make sure the cameras can be visible so that people will know that you’re watching them.
  • If you can get cameras that you can control through a separate control center, it might help use them.
  • Make sure your cameras are battery-powered so they will keep working even if the power is out.

Physical Barriers: Fences

Fences can be added outside your home and can secure the perimeter at large.  A good hard wooden or metal chain-link fence will be of big help, given that it has doors that are correctly secured.  It also needs to be tall enough so that it would be a challenge for an intruder to climb over it without the risk of injury.

Besides, a good fence needs support posts that go far into the ground to assure that the fence will not topple over or be shallow enough for someone to dig a hole beneath it.  Fortunately, most of today’s fences have support posts that can go one or two feet beneath the ground.

Keep Windows and Doors Locked

Locks are ever important for the doors, fences, windows, and any other place outside your property. Get lots of locks for your home to secure your safety. You can also think about getting separate key locks for separate places all-throughout your home. For example, the door to your home’s front might have a separate key than the door in the rear.

You may also want to get several different locks for some doors.  Having locks on the knob and the door’s body, plus a chain lock, could help.

Either way, you should replace the locks on your home every couple of years. This is to reduce the potential of someone breaking in and have locks that are new, sturdy, and ready for anything that may come their way.

On a related note, try and see if you can get your doors reinforced. If you have fragile doors, then you may choose to get new doors installed. Ones with metal interiors will always be best since they will make it extremely hard for anyone to break down.

Sealing Off Open Spaces

Open spaces can be deadly if the air quality becomes dangerous. This is essentially significant if there are a lot of chemicals in the air outside your home.

  • You can seal off many things in your home if you use the right materials. From cracks in the windows to cracks in the walls, all need to be sealed off.
  • Check the insulation throughout your home, and make sure there are no empty spots or coverage gaps.
  • Use caulk in spots where air might be coming in.
  • If you see large cracks in a space like your foundation or walls, spray foam may help seal off different materials and harden all sorts of surfaces.
  • A silicone tube can provide you with a sturdy liquid compound that can seal off windows and fix cracks in those windows.

Related:

Bugging-In: Prepping to Survive in Your Home

Why Would You Need to Bugging-In at Home?

Bugging In: Preparing for A Grid-Down Energy Needs

Emergency Food and Water Storage: Basic Survival Principles

Personal Hygiene in a Basic Emergency Sanitation: Maintaining Cleanliness

Devices to Help You Communicate Effectively in an Emergency Situation

DYI: First Aid Emergency Kit Contents List

Sources:

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/hunker–down

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Survival_Prepping/EFg7DwAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=hunker+down&pg=PT9&printsec=frontcover

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Be_a_Prepper/NkttjwEACAAJ?hl=en

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0omCB9VDB5DZjgftyIC9Rw

Continue Reading

Bugging In - Hunkering Down

Why Would You Need To Bugging-In at Home?

Published

on

Why Would You Need To Hunker Down

As mentioned in my previous post, several natural and human-made disasters can drive people into circumstances where you may need to take shelter for a long time. Preparing your home for survival is a must because each of the disasters has its own special dangers, and going over your bug in checklist is more important than ever.

The Outdoor Air Quality May Become Dangerous

The air quality may be compromised in the event of a nuclear accident or chemical attack. The super pollutants that could penetrate the air in such a case could make you seek shelter.

The Weather May Be Very Dangerous

Weather conditions cause most of us to stay put at one time or another. If a major disaster in winter caused the roads to be inaccessible and the power to be out, then you could easily be forced to depend only on yourself for an extended period of time. 

A generator-powered place set aside for the season is mandatory to avoid risking conditions that could be very hazardous.

There May Not Be Any Support Coming By Any Time Soon

Support may not be available to your area for some time, including aid in the form of supplies or the ability to leave your safe spot. The odds are certainly that help will come, but you may need to take care of yourself and your loved ones until it does.

Why Will Rescue Take So Long?

In some cases and circumstances, it may take an extended period of time for a rescue team to get to an area where a disaster has occurred. This can occur for many different reasons:

The roads may be hard to traverse due to flooding, cracking, or other problems.

  • Space could have become isolated due to physical changes in an environment.
  • The air quality may be too dangerous for rescuers to enter an area.
  • Financial issues may also be a concern for the government to get everything ready for rescue and recovery.  Usually, FEMA, the Red Cross, and others are there quickly, but we need to remember the government’s slow response to Hurricane Katrina.
  • War or other conflicts like those mentioned in Israel, Palestine, or the Democratic Republic of Congo could make it very hard for the proper authorities to get into a place.

Potential Outside Threats

The outside threats after a disaster can be especially dangerous. These can include:

  • Air pollution
  • The threat of weather conditions making an area even worse.  This includes flooding or avalanche/mudslide threats.
  • People being violent or turning to criminal activities.
  • Limited or no help from others you might ask for assistance

Related:

Bugging-In: Prepping to Survive in Your Home

Bugging In: Fortifying and Securing Your Home for SHTF Moment

Bugging In: Preparing for A Grid-Down Energy Needs

Emergency Food and Water Storage: Basic Survival Principles

Personal Hygiene in a Basic Emergency Sanitation: Maintaining Cleanliness

Devices to Help You Communicate Effectively in an Emergency Situation

DYI: First Aid Emergency Kit Contents List

Sources:

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/hunker–down

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Survival_Prepping/EFg7DwAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=hunker+down&pg=PT9&printsec=frontcover

https://www.google.com/books/edition/Be_a_Prepper/NkttjwEACAAJ?hl=en

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0omCB9VDB5DZjgftyIC9Rw

Continue Reading

Trending